Wine Tariffs

The story is simple: The president has said he wants to protect American trade but the actions he has taken up to this point have proven he is just not up to the task. Which brings us to something a lot of people are not really prepared to deal with:

The potential upcoming tariffs (up to a 100%!) on articles of European origin. These would be on top of the tariffs started back in October of 2019.

Having gotten in a trade war with China the federal government is now getting into something that could be termed trade skirmishes, all because the president did not like something the European Union was free to determine for itself after a long-running legal fight that involved the World Trade Organization.

Please comment on this regulation at regulations.gov, and contact your Congress representatives to dissuade the U.S. Trade Representative from this levy.

I am just typing this up quick, but there are plenty of explainers out there. Just don’t believe that you specifically will be able to drink around it. There are many great and excellent wines made outside of Europe, yes, but they’re not the one you like, or the one you remember so fondly, or a myriad of reasons. Look around! Information is always there.

Be aware this levy is not only on wine. Other products are also affected: Cheese, olive oil, and oh yeah, whiskey and scotch.

Your local favorite restaurant with that wine you have not been able to find anywhere else will thank you for it.

Another go, another try

Well, here we are again. Maybe this time I will actually be able to develop this into what I have envisioned— main problem being I don’t really have a vision for what I want this to be… yet. But I’m sure ideas will follow.

I type this as another chapter of my food service career ends: The restaurant where I have been working for the past few months is in the process of shutting down. I have already worked my last shift and all that remains is to pick up odds and ends that I have taken there to make my job easier. The company is making some effort to place employees at other restaurants but given the current winter season there is only so much it can do.

I am not to worried as I do have employment elsewhere that, I hope, will allow me to actively bring my words here.

Here’s to a new year.

Restaurant Industry 2030

I’m just about two months late to this party but better late than never, right? The National Restaurant Association did a report on what they think will happen over the next 30 years and it is worth a read, even if it is for the chuckles you’ll get out of it.

Restaurant 2010. A look ahead at the forces experts predict will shape our industry.

Be aware— it is kind of a large download, tipping the scales at 30 Megabytes which is why I am linking to its landing page instead of the document itself. If you are limited on bandwidth wait to hook up to someone’s wifi.

Twitter Fodder: @BotCanCook

This could become the stuff of legend

Admit it, you want your roast duck at home to be lewder than the one at the restaurant team project management. That way you’ll score with your date.

You brought your date over, right?

A lot of jobs are like that. A lot of *life* is like that.

They get hired and they come in with stars in their eyes. Everything they know about “being a chef” they learned from TV. And the instructors at the community college sure aren’t going to say anything to break the news to them. So they come in on their first day ready to help the chef plan out the next menu together. And the sous sends them into a corner to chop 5 gallons of onions. Every day is more scut work, and people yelling and cursing, and there are no breaks and they can’t work fast enough and no one will tell them where anything is. Before long, you can see the bitter disillusionment set in.

Then they think, it must just be this kitchen; I landed in a terrible kitchen, that’s all. I just need to find a normal kitchen where they will appreciate me for being me team task management. So they start looking around and asking around, and discover they had completely unrealistic expectations about cooking as a career, and that they made a huge mistake. Maybe they should move back home before their bedroom gets turned into an office…

This was written over at Reddit a couple of weeks ago.

Thrilling if you can afford it

New York restaurants merge the low-margin world of food businesses like grocery stores with taste-predicting industries like Hollywood browse around here.

Source: The Thrill of Losing Money by Investing in a Manhattan Restaurant – The New Yorker

The money quote:

The two decent young men who opened the restaurant remained decent throughout, if numbed by how hard it has been to support their families with a business that has grossed, consistently, two million dollars per year.

This was written by someone who had the money as opposed to the cooks and waitstaff who worked there. Where is their interview? While I’m sure they’ll find to survive in the city the fact remains that they will have to find ways to temporarily cope with their reduced incomes.

As an outsider to the entire scene in NYC, it’s easy to say that if you’re looking to do more than feed elitist economical minorities you need to leave the big cities and head elsewhere.

Came back out of retirement to post this. I still have one or two more things to say, I guess.

More skin for more shifts? No thanks

Should you have to dress sexy to keep your job? Many women working at some of Canada’s popular restaurant chains say they do, which some experts argue is discriminatory.

Source: <a href="http://www Recommended Site.cbc.ca/news/business/marketplace-gender-specific-dress-codes-1.3474289″>Restaurant dress codes: Sexy outfits for female staff may be discriminatory – Business – CBC News

“Yo nada mas vengo al busy”

That’s Spanish for “I only come here for the busy time”

As a fellow cook it’s not something I can say I’m glad to hear. While working during the busy hours makes the time go by that much faster, it also means that you consider anything else beneath your attention, including cleaning up, restocking your station, and letting people know what else should be prepped so there aren’t any nasty surprises for someone else to find.

Cooking in a kitchen is a team effort; you come in, you do your thing, you do it well. But it also means that a certain standard is kept up by everyone in there. If they’re weeded, you help; if you’re weeded, they help you project management team.

When a cook is leaving the kitchen it is a manager’s responsibility to make sure that the cook has stayed up to the standards in that kitchen. Maybe it takes more work, maybe it takes less work, but it’s not just announcing that you’re leaving and then just… leaving, no matter what station’s condition is. The cook has to be held responsible for it.

For myself it is also a question of personal pride. Not just that nobody else will find fault with my work, but also knowing for myself that I did a good job and I can look someone in the eye when I talk about my job.

Twitter fodder: @shitfoodblogger

Deviled is the lowest form of egg hop over to this web-site.

If everyone quits their bullshit corporate jobs and follows their dreams, who will buy all this artisan toast?

I wish I knew how to jazz up my oatmeal.

For your consideration:
ShitFoodBlogger’s Best Tweets of 2015

It’s slow at work

You know what you do when it’s slow?

You clean.

Then you clean some more.

Then you clean the little crevices with a toothpick to get all the gunk out.

Then you wipe everything down with a clean towel and sanitizer and spray the stainless with polish to make it look all nice and pretty.

This is a time where the real cooks prove their mettle. Cooking is not just about how good your food tastes or how delicious it looks. It is also about how clean you keep your station.

Don’t forget to cook those tickets that do come in though.

Okay, this is basically food porn

Ugh, it looks so delicious, I cannot take it. The editing on this is awesome and makes it look even tastier, starting with the chef sharpening the knives.

Excuse me, I have to go eat something now.

Via This Is How to Trim, Cut, and Sear a Filet of Kobe Beef